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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the misdeeds. we talk to john burns of "the new york times" and david folkenflik of npr. >> brown: then, we ask nuclear regulatory commission chair gregory jaczko if u.s. reactors could withstand an earthquake like the one that devastated japan. >> ifill: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on the challenges and the troubles facing one of the world's largest democracies. >> it made tremendous strides politically and economically but still struggles with corruption. >> brown: kwame holman updates the budget battles as the house and senate offer dueling plans for reducing the deficit. >> ifill: and judy woodruff explores the deadline-driven deal cutting underway with political editor david chalian. >> brown: plus, in a season of tornadoes, floods and more, we get some poetic perspective on the beauty and power of nature. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind,
, as theation is staring down so much debt. we first heard about this on npr, and had no idea it was going on. here's abc's jon karl. >> reporter: we took a journey to the heart of the u.s. mint in philadelphia. down long corridors, into oversized elevators and through doors, lots of doors, for a lesson on how to lose money while making money. it sounds a little like vegas around here, except the coins never stop coming. this is the presidential dollar coin. they're making them to honor every dead president, but nobody seems to want them. not even the one for rutherford b. hayes. rutherford b. hayes, hot off the press. literally, these coins are still warm. made of manganese brass, they coco 32 cents a pop to make. the mint can make 1.8 million a day. do the math. that's nearly $600,000 a day. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the federal reserve in baltimore, the coins are packed into plastic bags stacked one on top of each other all the way up and down this aisle. several aisle of them
dollars down the drain. thanks to npr we know about loads of unused spare change piling up as the nation stares down its debt. abc's jon karl explains. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president but nobody seems to want them. they cost 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about 600,000 dollars a day to make them. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the federal reserve in baltimore, the coins are packed into plastic bags stacked one on top of each other all the way up and down this aisle several aisles of them, millions and millions of dollars in presidential coins. federal reserve says they are piling up so quickly they are spending $650,000 to build a new vault in dallas to hold them. shipping the coins there will cost another $3
at npr. skip over our speaker for a moment, over the podium as well, melissa sharp with new silk media. she is our fantastic speakers committee chair. skip over our second speaker for a moment, the key to seem to press secretary with the natural resources defense council. also the organizer of today's event. we thank you for that, bob. we are told that it is a vote and we are awaiting another guest of the speaker, congressman brad miller of north carolina. then moving on down, andrea stone, correspondent for "huffington post." glow is washington director of reporters without borders and a vital member of our press freedom member and al isley is editor at large who tells me been blogging for "huffington post" since day one. now please a large amount of applause for everyone. [applause] >> if there were a king and queen of online journalism, our headline to a guest speakers could be considered candidates for members of the royal family. when tim armstrong and arianna huffington announced aol's purchase of "huffington post" in february it marked not just yet another reshaping of aol but a
. host: npr has aw series has awho serves." a piece -- the decision to enlist offers direction. . opfc, 23 from connecticut playing with his bomb sniffing dog. he was then a few bar fight before his mother jokingly suggested he fight for his country and the next day he enlisted the marine corps. it profiles of other young man who found direction and focus. could that be a focus? guest: of course. i love that stuff. i hear from my students. you wouldn't think that as a service academy you would not have -- which is graduated one. i love this guy to death. he is in the basic of the were the demolition school for seals. he has wanted to be a seal ever since he got direction. lessas kind of thing root kid. he graduated the top 20 or 30 of his class. and it gives direction. absolutely, that can be a reason. but once again, it cannot be curdled, as i say, as milk curdles. it can be curbed by telling these -- guys and gals that they are better -- the civilians are paying for you to become the type of person you want to be. thank civilian. host: and a profile from a lance corporal from frederi
not think planned parenthood should be getting $400 million from the american government. i think npr can function ju fine on its own. that would be nearly $1 billion a year, $10 billion over a decade, if we just cut out those two programs. there many places we could cut that we're spending on programs that we do not need, wasteful programs. when the gao cn find $200 billion in cuts, that a significant. host:n your view, what is the proper role of government? guest: xiii, the government is ordained by god. punish those who do evil and reward those which is right. the government should be maintaining law and order and to be fostering a society in which exemplary behavior is rewarded and less than exemplary behavior is not. and there's a moral symmetry to the society. i think government and the country as wealthy as ours, we should be looking out for the welfare and health of the people within the ability of the government and the ability of the country to pay we cannot do everything. that is part of the problem. washington has been tried to do everything. they have been kicking the can dow
are wondering where the government can cut costs. the npr came up with one idea. >> each day the u.s. treasury mints nearly $2 million in coins. coins that mostly go directly into storage. abc's john karl checked it out. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia where they seem to have more doors than "get smart." for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. it sounds a little bit like las vegas around here except the coins never stop coming. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president. but nobody seems to want them. rutherford b. hayes. hot off the press, literally, these coins are still warm. made of manganese brass, they cost nearly 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about $600,000 a day to make them. and each one of these bags, 140,000 coins, $140,000, more than 2,000 pounds. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the f
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)